Baroque and roll – Hendrix joins Handel in Mayfair

Jimi Hendrix in his flat at 23 Brook Street Credit: Handel House Trust
Classical composition meets 1960s rock as Jimi Hendrix’s London flat opens next door to Handel’s house, and invites fans in for the first time.

Home to guitar legend Hendrix at the height of his fame, the third floor flat of 23 Brook Street has been returned to its 1960s state following several years of restoration – made possible by National Lottery players.

From his personal vinyl record collection to replicas of the turquoise curtains he and girlfriend Kathy Etchingham bought from John Lewis, the flat is a time capsule of Hendrix’s London life. 

Just a short walk from legendary venues such as The Speakeasy Club and The Marquee Club where Hendrix often played, the new Hendrix Museum offers an insight into London’s late-1960s music scene, as well as the ordered domestic life of one of its legends. Hendrix lived in the flat from 1968 to 1969, and described it as “the only home I ever had”. 

By chance, 25 Brook Street - just next door - was home to another world-famous musician. More than two centuries before Hendrix moved in, George Frederic Handel lived in the building for 36 years and it was where he composed many of his most-loved works, including 'Messiah'.  It is said that music students looking for the Baroque composer’s home would often mistakenly knock on Jimi Hendrix’s door.

The restoration, carried out by the Handel House Trust with a £1.2million grant from HLF, means visitors can now see behind the scenes of the lives of two very different, but equally influential, figures of musical heritage.

The Hendrix Museum opens to the public from 10 February 2016.

For more information visit the Handel and Hendrix in London website.

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